law firm landing pageThe right landing page can make a tremendous difference in the results you achieve with your marketing efforts. Whether visitors are coming from paid advertisements, social media links, or search engines, your landing pages are what make that all-important first impression. Any marketing campaign that doesn’t make them a top priority is doomed to fail.

With so much riding on it, designing a landing page can seem a bit intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Every landing page is different, but they all share common core elements that make them effective. Once you understand those elements and how they work, creating a killer law firm landing page becomes much easier.

Define the Purpose of Your Landing Page

Before you do anything else, you’ll need to figure out what you want to accomplish with your landing page, or pages. You may be able to guide all your incoming traffic to one page, or you might need to create separate pages for traffic coming from different sources. It all depends on your goals.

In general, landing pages serve one of three purposes:

Lead Generation Landing Pages

This type of page is used to generate warm leads. There is usually a form that asks for detailed contact information such as name, telephone number, and email address. There may also be space where the user can write freely to explain what they are hoping to achieve and why they want to be contacted.

Opt-In Landing Pages

An opt-in page offers the visitor some kind of reward for submitting their email address and opting in to receive your content in their inbox. An example of this type of landing page would be offering access to a guide or e-book download when a visitor submits their email address. This type of landing page is sometimes called a “lead magnet” offer.

Webinar Signup Landing Pages

Another popular type of landing page is the webinar signup. Technically, this type of page is similar to an opt-in page. You’re offering the visitor a reward (access to the webinar) in exchange for their information. In many cases, webinar content is even more of a draw than something like an e-book, and placing a timer counting down to the start of the webinar adds a sense of urgency that helps drive action.

The Three Basic Elements Of Landing Pages

Once you know what you want your visitors to do when they arrive at your landing pages, it’s time to plan how to make that action happen. No matter which type of landing page you’ve decided to put together, it should contain the following three basic elements.

A Value Proposition

First and foremost, you need to show your visitors that you can give them something of value. Your landing page should present a clear solution to a problem of your target audience. Whether you’re offering a product, a service, or information, it should be clear that there is something valuable waiting for the visitor if they complete the action.

A Call To Action

It should go without saying, but somehow a call to action still gets left out of all sorts of online marketing content. If you want someone to do something, you need to tell them to do it. You’d be surprised at how significantly conversions increase when you simply tell your visitors what you want them to do. You should have clear copy on your landing page that tells your visitors exactly what you want them to do. If it makes sense, it should appear in more than one place.

Visual Media

Last, but not least, your landing page should have appealing visual media. This could be well placed pictures or video content, but there should be something visual that helps break up the text on the page. Ideally, when someone hits the page, they should see an eye-catching headline, a visually pleasing image, and a small block of text that let’s them know why they should want to see more.

Writing The Copy For Your Landing Page

The final step to putting a landing page together for your law firm is going to be writing the actual text for the page. It’s not as difficult as you might think. The main thing to remember here is to be as direct as possible and don’t overcomplicate things. The text required could be several paragraphs, or it might just be a headline with a few bullet points. It’s all going to depend on the overall purpose of the page you’re creating.

It’s Not You, It’s Them

Above all, as you’re putting together the text for your page, remember that your readers don’t care what you do, they only care what you can do for them. Everything on this page should be geared toward telling the reader how they can benefit from a stronger relationship with you and/or your law firm.

Create A Strong Headline

The headline should grab the reader’s attention right away. It may be the only chance you have to convince your visitor to look over the rest of the page. It should inform the reader, with just a glance, what they can expect to get from your firm, or at the least, what they can expect if they read the rest of the page.

Get To The Point

After the headline, you need to get to the point and tell your visitors how you’re going to provide that value we discussed. If they don’t see your entire solution on the first screen of the page, they should at least see a clear statement about what problem you intend to solve for them. Let them know what they’re getting right away. If there’s any confusion, they won’t stick around to figure it out.

Provide Limited Options

Your landing page(s) shouldn’t contain all the normal navigation links that appear on the rest of your website. Everything they see should be, for the most part, directing them to complete the desired action. You can, however, provide links to other areas of your website that back up the claims you’re making on the landing page.

The idea is to give them the ability to “research” what they’re reading without making it difficult. For example, if you mention your firm’s experience, you can provide a link to biography pages that show the attorneys’ qualifications and work history. If you talk about client satisfaction with results, you can link to past client testimonials.

Don’t overdo it though. The goal is to provide some extra information without turning it into a distraction.

Test, Tweak, Repeat

With everything above, you should now be able to put together a solid landing page. From there, it’s just a matter of monitoring results, tweaking the elements of your page(s), and working to find the combination that works best for you, your firm, and your audience.

The good news is that as you continue to test and tune for better results, the process gets easier. Once you have one landing page that gets good results, you can use it as a template for creating more for future campaigns.

generate leads